5 Common Misconceptions About Property Management

08/07/2024

There are several common misconceptions about property management that can lead to misunderstandings or false expectations:

  1. Property Managers Just Collect Rent: While rent collection is part of their responsibilities, property managers also handle tenant screening, property maintenance, lease enforcement, financial reporting, and more. They play a crucial role in ensuring properties are well-maintained and tenants are satisfied.
  2. Property Managers Only Benefit Property Owners: While property managers work on behalf of property owners, their role also benefits tenants by providing responsive maintenance, enforcing fair lease terms, and ensuring a safe and comfortable living environment. A well-managed property benefits both parties.
  3. Property Management Is Only for Large Properties: Property management services are beneficial for properties of all sizes, from single-family homes to large apartment complexes. Even individual landlords can benefit from outsourcing tasks like tenant screening and maintenance.
  4. Property Managers Are Expensive and Not Worth It: While property management fees exist, they are typically justified by the time and expertise they save property owners. Professional management often leads to higher tenant retention rates, reduced vacancy periods, and better maintenance practices, ultimately saving money in the long run.
  5. Property Managers Can Solve Every Problem Instantly: Property managers work diligently to address issues, but they cannot resolve every problem instantly. They must follow legal protocols, coordinate with contractors, and respect tenant rights, which can sometimes lead to delays in resolution. Clear communication with tenants and owners can help manage expectations in these situations.

Understanding these misconceptions can help property owners and tenants alike have more realistic expectations of what property management entails and how it benefits all parties involved.

Healthy Homes – changes to ventilation standards

13/09/2022

he ventilation standard now allows properties with certain continuous mechanical ventilation in kitchens and bathrooms to meet the ventilation standard.

If your home was built with a continuous mechanical ventilation system, to meet the standard it must:

  • be designed to vent extracted air continuously from residential property to the outdoors, and for a kitchen or bathroom, extracts the air directly from the room, and
  • have been installed in the property or a tenancy building that first received building consent on or after 1 November 2019 and was part of that original building consent, and continues to meet the requirements of the building consent.

Alternatively, if your home has been renovated and now includes a continuous mechanical ventilation system, to meet the standard, the system must:

  • be designed to provide ventilation for multiple rooms and to continuously vent extracted air to the outdoors, and
  • extract air directly out of the kitchen and bathroom, with an exhaust capacity of at least 12 ℓ/s in the kitchen and 10 ℓ/s in the bathroom. The actual flow rate may be varied (manually or automatically), in response to the demand for ventilation.

Recirculating systems (products like HRV and DVS systems), or fans that do not extract to the outdoors are not suitable to meet the ventilation standard.

Updates to Healthy Homes

16/08/2022

The Healthy Homes Standards have been updated with improvements to the heating, ventilation, and moisture ingress and drainage standards.

One improvement is a new formula for the heating standard, that applies for modern dwellings built after 2008 and certain apartments.

The formula change recognises that these types of properties are better at retaining heat.

The heating assessment tool has also been updated to calculate the required minimum heating capacity using both the new and original formula.

The Tenancy Services website has been updated to include these changes.

https://www.tenancy.govt.nz/healthy-homes/changes-to-the-healthy-homes-standards/

Damage caused by weather

19/07/2022

Wild weather can cause damage at your rental property. Find out what to do if your rental needs repairs after extreme weather or a natural disaster.

Landlords are responsible for maintaining the property in a reasonable condition. This includes fixing any damage caused by severe weather or a natural disaster.

Find out what to do if you are a tenant or a landlord here:

https://www.tenancy.govt.nz/about-tenancy-services/news/damage-because-of-weather-events/

Considered including Sections Maintained in your Tenancy Agreement?

10/05/2022

A question many owners find themselves struggling to answer….

If you’re a tenant, you’re responsible for keeping the property reasonably clean and tidy. This includes mowing the lawns and weeding the gardens. There are many tenants that do a great job of maintaining their sections. However most struggle to keep them at an acceptable standard.

Some things that may help you decide whether to include section maintenance are:

  • Tenants are more likely to accept rent increases, as there is a regular reminder that the landlord is taking care of the property.
  • Having your property maintained by a professional ensures a great first impression when we re-lease your property in the future
  • Tenants don’t need to worry about handling lawn care, and the landlord knows it is getting done right. 

Any arrangement regarding lawncare and gardening should be detailed in the tenancy agreement and discussed before the tenant’s term starts and be monitored over time. 

Privacy Act 2020

12/04/2022

The Privacy Act 2020 governs how agencies collect, store, use, disclose, and give access to personal information. As a landlord or property manager, you need to comply with the Privacy Act. Personal information covered by the Privacy Act is any information that tells you something about a specific individual.

Landlords can only collect personal information in ways that are lawful, fair, and not unreasonably intrusive The Privacy Act is organised around 13 information privacy principles.

Click the link to explore each of the privacy principles https://www.privacy.org.nz/privacy-act-2020/privacy-principles/

Wear and tear vs Intentional damage

18/01/2022

Fair wear and tear refers to the gradual deterioration of things that are used regularly in a property when people live in it.

A tenant is not responsible for normal fair wear and tear to the property or any chattels provided by the landlord when they use them normally. The tenant is responsible for any intentional or careless damage.

An example of this would be where a stove element wears out from normal cooking. This is fair wear and tear. However, if the stove was being used to heat the kitchen and stopped working properly, this would not be considered normal use.

Examples of what is usually considered fair wear and tear are:

  • flooring getting worn
  • taps and washers in the kitchen, bathroom or laundry wearing out or leaking

 Examples of what is not normally considered fair wear and tear are:

  • burn marks or drink stains on the carpet
  • drawing on wallpaper

You can find out more on damages and repairs at https://www.tenancy.govt.nz/maintenance-and-inspections/repairs-and-damages/

KiwiHarvest Christmas Food Drive

04/01/2022

In December the team at T And T Property Management jumped on board with Healthy Families Invercargill to support the KiwiHarvest Food Drive to help distribute food to vulnerable families in Southland over the Christmas period. 🥫🎄

KiwiHarvest collects good, nutritious food before it goes to waste and distributes to frontline agencies, helping to feed our most vulnerable. Locally the demand for KiwiHarvest’s donations has been very high. They are now 18 recipient organisations benefiting from KiwiHarvest’s food distribution on a weekly basis, with even more organisations receiving donations from time to time and others on the waiting list.

We had many many items donated by our tenants, suppliers and locals that had seen our posts online. We were so thrilled to be a part of the Food Drive and were very grateful to each and everyone of those that donated to such a great cause. Knowing that many of our vulnerable families would be fed over Christmas and received a Christmas they deserved filled our hearts.

You can check out the amazing work KiwiHarvest do by visiting their website.www.kiwiharvest.org.nz

Safety over the Holiday period

21/12/2021

Heading away for the Christmas break? While this can be a very exciting time we also need to think about the safety of your home and possessions while you are away.

Here are a few things to make sure you return home with all your belongings still in place.

  • Ensure that you have switched off the gas and have electric appliances unplugged with the switches turned off at the wall.
  • Burglars will often look for signs like boots and shoes left by the front door to see who lives in a house. Even when you are away, leave a few pairs of shoes by the door, including man sized boots
  • Check carefully that all your windows and doors are well secured before you leave your home
  • Tell a trusted neighbor that you’ll be away. See if they can check on your home and take your mail and packages inside your home, or even park a car in your driveway to make it look like someone is still home
  • Don’t leave valuable items in places, where they can be seen through a window. 

How much power do appliances use?

07/12/2021

There are many appliances that we use in our homes – also many that we use daily. The high end areas are usually in the kitchen, and laundry. Appliance such as ovens & stove, fridge, dishwasher etc.

You might be surprised to know how much each one of your electrical appliances costs to run. Being aware of which everyday household appliances have higher running costs is a good way to avoid higher energy bills. Check out the link below for a guide on house hold appliances and their power usage.

https://www.powershop.co.nz/assets/Resource-Hub/Saving-Electricity/Main-Hub/63c48ace03/Appliances-and-their-power-usage.pdf

If you’re shopping for a new whiteware appliance, TV, fridge or heat pump, you’ll see an Energy Rating label prominently displayed on the products.

The label shows a simple star rating – the more stars, the more energy-efficient the appliance. The label also features an annual energy consumption (kWh per year), calculated from average expected use.